Star Trek The Next Generation: Every Episode (#IronViz 3)

It’s that time again – Iron Viz feeder contest!  The third and final round for a chance to battle at conference in a chef coat is upon us.  This round the focus was on anything ‘Silver Screen.’

With a limitless topic I was certain that I would find myself in a creative rut that would likely result in submitting something at the end of the submission time period (August 13th).  So I am as shocked as anyone else that I have a fully formed submission way before deadline.

So what’s the topic and what got me unstuck?  Star Trek of course!  The backstory here is amazing – I went to a belated wedding shower for a few friends and they mentioned to me that they were going to the annual Star Trek convention.  And more specifically there was a special celebration occurring – the 30th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation.  Not even up for debate – it just IS the best incarnation of the Star Trek universe.

So I decided to take a moment to do some research on finding TNG data.  It didn’t take me long to unearth this fantastic data set on GitHub that includes each episode’s script parsed out by character.

Really inspired by the thought of seeing each word of each episode visualized – I set forth on my mission.  As I got started there was one component that was mission critical: the bold colors present throughout the world of Star Trek.  The bold and moody colors of Star Trek are fantastic – especially paired with a black background.  And working with individual scripts meant that I could use color to accentuate different characters – much like their uniforms do in the episodes.

The next component that I wanted to invoke on this (again – design focused here) was the electronics and computer interfaces.  I particularly like the rounded edges and strong geometric shapes that are on the computer screens across all iterations of Star Trek.  So that describes most of the design – the choice of colors and how some of the visualizations were setup.

Now on to the next important component here: analysis.  When you see this visualization you may find yourself realizing that I don’t draw any conclusions.  For this collection of visualizations I am playing the role of curator.  I am developing a visual world for you to interact with, to go deep and wide in your understanding.  I am not attempting to summarize data for you or force conclusions upon you.  I am inviting you to come into the world of Star Trek, unearth who speaks during each episode, find out what that character is saying.  I want there to be an unending number of takeaways and perceptions generated from this.

And the last part you need to understand is the story telling.  This entire visualization has an untold number of stories in it by virtue of it being a visualization of the entire series.  If you want a meta-story to tell it’s simply this: Star Trek The Next Generation is such a deep and rich world that you should go get lost.  And while you’re on the path of getting lost do me a favor: retain some leadership tidbits from Picard and sprinkle in some logical takeaways from Data.

 

#IronViz – Let’s Go on a Pokémon Safari!

It’s that time again – Iron Viz!  The second round of Iron Viz entered my world via an email with a very enticing “Iron Viz goes on Safari!” theme.  My mind immediately got stuck on one thing: Pokémon Safari Zone.

Growing up I was a huge gamer and Pokémon was (and still is) one of my favorites.  I even have a cat named after a Pokémon, it’s Starly (find her in the viz!).  So I knew if I was going to participate that the idea for Pokémon Safari was the only way to go.

I spent a lot of time thinking about how I might want to bring this to life.  Did I want to do a virtual safari of all the pocket monsters?  Did I want to focus on the journey of Ash Ketchum through the Safari Zone?  Did I want to focus on the video games?

After all the thoughts swirled through my mind – I settled on the idea of doing a long form re-creation of Ash Ketchum’s adventure through the Safari Zone in the anime.  I sat down and googled to figure out the episode number and go watch.  But to my surprise the episode has been banned.  It hasn’t made it on much TV and the reason it is banned makes it very unattractive and unfriendly for an Iron Viz long form.  I was gutted and had to set off on a different path.

The investment into the Safari Zone episode got me looking through the general details of the Safari Zone in the games.  And that’s what ended up being my hook.  I tend to think in a very structured format and because there were 4 regions that HAD Safari Zones (or what I’d consider to be the general spirit of one) it made it easy for me to compare each of them against each other.

Beyond that I knew I wanted to keep the spirit of the styling similar to the games.  My goal for the viz is to give the end user an understanding of the types of Pokémon in each game.  To show some basic details about each pocket monster, but to have users almost feel like they’re on the Safari.

There’s also this feeling I wanted to capture – for anyone who has played Pokémon you may know it.  It’s the shake of the tall grass.  It is the tug of the Fishing Pole.  It’s the screen transition.  In a nutshell: what Pokémon did I just encounter?  There is a lot of magic in that moment of tall grass shake and transition to ‘battle’ or ‘encounter’ screen.

My hope is that I captured that well with the treemaps.  You are walking through each individual area and encountering Pokémon.  For the seasoned Safari-goer, you’ll be more interested in knowing WHERE you should go and understanding WHAT you can find there.  Hence the corresponding visuals surrounding.

The last component of this visualization was the Hover interactivity.  I hope it translates well because I wanted the interactivity to be very fluid.  It isn’t a click and uncover – that’s too active.  I wanted this to be a very passive and openly interactive visualization where the user would unearth more through exploring and not have to click.

#IronViz Entry – Mobile Design

Part of being involved in the Tableau community means publicly publishing visualizations to learn and grow.  It’s also a great way to find inspiration.

As I’ve pushed myself to be more active within the local Phoenix Tableau community and social (Twitter) community, I knew it was time to “step up” and make an Iron Viz.

My design aesthetic tends to be minimal, slightly formal, and geared toward (in my mind) elegance.  I like to make dashboards and visualizations that highlight the data, but don’t jump to many conclusions.  I’m very conclusion agnostic, so leading people too far down a path doesn’t always seem right.

All that being said – I wanted to make an Iron Viz entry, but it needed to be simple.  The deadline is September 18 (today as I’m writing this).  So I wanted to develop something relatively straightforward that got to the heart of mobile design.

The data inspiration for the viz actually came from an animated bar chart .gif showing the “Top 10 Economies” growth from 1969 to 2030 that I saw on Twitter.  I thought it would make a nice bump chart or slope chart, and the conclusion of the data was already compelling.

First the data gathering process – relatively simple on this one.  The .gif referenced the source, a quick Google search led me to the results.  I’m going to loosely promise to publish the excel file at some point.

Next up was diving right in.  I recently made a “micro viz” in Tableau 10, designing it exclusively for a very tiny space.  I actually didn’t use the device designer for this one, instead opting to develop the whole thing with my intended sizing.  With the sizing set, development was similar to what I’ve done in the past in v9.3 (version of Tableau I use at my job).

Transitioning to device specific design was different than I thought.  Since I knew the final product (in my mind) would need to have more emphasis placed on the mobile view.  It is after all a mobile design challenge!

Like I mentioned above, I had a pretty good idea of what I wanted the final viz to look like.  I knew there needed to be a bump chart and I was going to call attention to China and India.  What I didn’t realize is that the device designer is really geared toward creating a “master view” and then augmenting that master for the device.  This makes sense to me as I rethink the way the feature was presented.

What this meant for the creative process?  I wasn’t able to make visualizations (sheets) and quickly drop them on the mobile layout.  For each new “potential viz” I had to first drop it on the overall dashboard and then bring it on to the mobile specific dash.  It made the whole process kind of clunky.

I also struggled a bit with getting to formatting features quickly.  I can’t double click on titles to adjust font sizes in device preview, gotta go back to the default layout.  I’ll have to adjust my thought process next time and really think about starting from the default view and optimizing a mobile version.

I probably cheated the viz out of more depth that could have been added if I had truly started with the default dashboard and then made a mobile design.  It is fair to say that the default dashboard has real estate for more data insight and data depth.  I am still very pleased with the overall final results.