A follow up to The Women of #IronViz

It’s now 5 days removed from the Tableau Conference (#data17) and the topic of women in data visualization and the particularly pointed topic of women competing in Tableau’s #IronViz competition is still fresh on everyone’s mind.

First – I think it’s important to recognize how awesome the community reception of this topic has been.  Putting together a visualization that highlights a certain subsection of our community is not without risk.  While going through the build process, I wanted to keep the visualization in the vein of highlighting the contributions of women in the community.  It wasn’t meant to be selective or exclusive, instead, a visual display of something I was interested in understanding more about.  Despite being 5 days removed from the conference, the conversations I’ve been involved in (and observed from a distance) have all remained inclusive and positive.  I’ve seen plenty of people searching for understanding and hunting for more data points.  I’ve also seen a lot of collaboration around solutions and collecting the data we all seek.  What I’m thankful that I have not witnessed is blame or avoidance.  In my mind this speaks volumes to the brilliant and refined members of our community and their general openness and acceptance of change, feedback, and improvement.

One thing circling the rounds that I felt compelled to iterate off of, is @visualibrarian’s recent blog post that has interview style questions and answers around the topic.  I am a big believer in self reflection and exploration and was drawn to her call to action (maybe it was the punny and sarcastic nature of the ask) to answer the questions she put forth.

1. Tell me about yourself. What is your professional background? When did you participate in Iron Viz?

My professional background is that of a data analyst.  Although I have a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics, my first professional role was as a Pharmacy Technician entering prescriptions.  That quickly morphed into someone dedicated to reducing prescription entry errors and built on itself over and over to be put in roles like quality improvement and process engineering.  I’ve always been very reliant on data and data communication (in my early days as PowerPoint) to help change people and processes.  About 2 or 3 years ago I got fed up with being the business user at the mercy of traditional data management or data owners and decided to brute force my way into the “IT” side of things.  I was drawn to doing more with data and having better access to it.  Fast-forward to the role I’ve had for a little over 8 months as a Data Visualization Consultant.  Which essentially means I spend a significant amount of my time partnering with organizations to either enable them to use visual analytics, improve the platforms that they are currently using, or overcoming any developmental obstacles they may have.  It also means I spend a significant amount of time championing the power of data visualization and sharing “best practices” on the topic.  I often call myself a “data champion” because I seek simply to be the voice of the data sets I’m working with.  I’m there to help people understand what they’re seeing.

In terms of Iron Viz – I first participated in 2016’s 3rd round feeder, Mobile Iron Viz.  I’ve since participated in every feeder round since.  And that’s the general plan on my end, continue to participate until I make it on stage or they tell me to stop 🙂

2. Is Tableau a part of your job/professional identity?

Yes – see answer to question #1.  It’s pretty much my main jam right now.  But I want to be very clear on this point – I consider my trade visual analytics, data visualization, and data analytics.  Tableau is to me the BEST tool to use within my trade.  By no means the only tool I use, but the most important one for my role.

3. How did you find out about Iron Viz?

When I first started getting more deeply involved in my local User Group, I found out about the competition.  Over time I became the leader of my user group and a natural advocate for the competition.  Once I became a part of the social community (via Twitter) it was easy to keep up with the ins and outs of the competition.

4. Did you have any reservations about participating in Iron Viz?

Absolutely – I still have reservations.  The first one I participated in was sort of on the off chance because I found something that I want to re-visualize in a very pared down elegant, simplistic way.  I ended up putting together the visualization in a very short period of time and after comparing it to the other entries I felt my entry was very out of place.  I tend to shy away from putting text heavy explanations within my visualizations, so I’ve felt very self-conscience that my designs don’t score well on “story telling.”  It was also very hard in 2016 and the beginning of 2017.  Votes were based off of Twitter.  You could literally search for your hashtag and see how many people liked your viz.  It’s a very humbling and crushing experience when you don’t see any tweets in your favor.

5. Talk me through your favorite submission to Iron Viz. What did you like about it? Why?

Ah – they are all my favorite for different reasons.  For each entry I’ve always remained committed and deeply involved in what the data represents.  Independent of social response, I have always been very proud of everything I’ve developed.  For no other reason than the challenge of understanding a data set further and for bringing a new way to visually display it.  My mobile entry was devastatingly simple – I love it to death because it is so pared down (the mobile version).  For geospatial I made custom shapes for each of the different diamond grades.  It’s something I don’t think anyone in the world knows I did – and for me it really brought home the lack of interest I have in diamonds as rare coveted items.

6. What else do you remember about participating in Iron Viz?

The general anxiety around it.  For geospatial 2017 I procrastinated around the topic so much.  My parents actually came to visit me and I took time away from being with them to complete.  I remember my mom consoling me because I was so adamant that I needed to participate.

Safari and Silver Screen were different experiences for me.  I immediately locked in on data sets on subjects I loved, so there was less stress.  When I did the Star Trek entry I focused on look and feel of the design and was so stoked that the data set even existed.  Right now I am watching The Next Generation nightly and I go back to that visualization to see how it compares to my actual perception of each episode (in terms of speaking pace and flow).

7. Which Iron Viz competitions did you participate in, and why?

Everything since 2016 feeder round 3.  I felt a personal obligation and an obligation to my community to participate.  It was also a great way for me to practice a lot of what I tell others – face your fears and greet them as an awesome challenge.  Remain enthusiastic and excited about the unknown.  It’s not always easy to practice, but it makes the results so worth it.

8. What competitions did you not participate in, and why?

Anything before mobile – and only because I (most likely) didn’t know about it.  Or maybe more appropriately stated – I wasn’t connected enough to the community to know of it’s existence or how to participate.

9. Do you participate in any other (non Iron Viz) Tableau community events?

Yes – I participate in #MakeoverMonday and #WorkoutWednesday.  My goal for the end of 2017 is to have all 52 for each completed.  Admittedly I am a bit off track right now, but I plan on closing that gap soon.  I also participate in #VizForSocialGood and have participated in past User Group viz contests.  I like to collect things and am a completionist – so these are initiatives that I’ve easily gotten hooked on.  I’ve also reaped so many benefits from participation.  Not just the growth that’s occurred, but the opportunity to connect with like-minded individuals across the globe.  It’s given me the opportunity to have peers that can challenge me and to be surrounded by folks that I aspire to be more like.  It keeps me excited about getting better and knowing more about our field.  It’s a much richer and deeper environment than I have ever found working within a single organization.

10. Do you have any suggestions for improving representation in Iron Viz?

  • Make it more representative of the actual stage contest
  • Single data set
  • Everyone submits on the same day
  • People don’t tweet or reveal submissions until contest closes
  • Judges provide scoring results to individual participants
  • The opportunity to present analysis/results, the “why”
  • Blind submissions – don’t reveal participants until results are posted
  • Incentives for participation!  It would be nice to have swag or badges or a gallery of all the submissions afterward

And in case you just came here to see the visualization that’s set as the featured image, here’s the link.

Star Trek The Next Generation: Every Episode (#IronViz 3)

It’s that time again – Iron Viz feeder contest!  The third and final round for a chance to battle at conference in a chef coat is upon us.  This round the focus was on anything ‘Silver Screen.’

With a limitless topic I was certain that I would find myself in a creative rut that would likely result in submitting something at the end of the submission time period (August 13th).  So I am as shocked as anyone else that I have a fully formed submission way before deadline.

So what’s the topic and what got me unstuck?  Star Trek of course!  The backstory here is amazing – I went to a belated wedding shower for a few friends and they mentioned to me that they were going to the annual Star Trek convention.  And more specifically there was a special celebration occurring – the 30th anniversary of Star Trek: The Next Generation.  Not even up for debate – it just IS the best incarnation of the Star Trek universe.

So I decided to take a moment to do some research on finding TNG data.  It didn’t take me long to unearth this fantastic data set on GitHub that includes each episode’s script parsed out by character.

Really inspired by the thought of seeing each word of each episode visualized – I set forth on my mission.  As I got started there was one component that was mission critical: the bold colors present throughout the world of Star Trek.  The bold and moody colors of Star Trek are fantastic – especially paired with a black background.  And working with individual scripts meant that I could use color to accentuate different characters – much like their uniforms do in the episodes.

The next component that I wanted to invoke on this (again – design focused here) was the electronics and computer interfaces.  I particularly like the rounded edges and strong geometric shapes that are on the computer screens across all iterations of Star Trek.  So that describes most of the design – the choice of colors and how some of the visualizations were setup.

Now on to the next important component here: analysis.  When you see this visualization you may find yourself realizing that I don’t draw any conclusions.  For this collection of visualizations I am playing the role of curator.  I am developing a visual world for you to interact with, to go deep and wide in your understanding.  I am not attempting to summarize data for you or force conclusions upon you.  I am inviting you to come into the world of Star Trek, unearth who speaks during each episode, find out what that character is saying.  I want there to be an unending number of takeaways and perceptions generated from this.

And the last part you need to understand is the story telling.  This entire visualization has an untold number of stories in it by virtue of it being a visualization of the entire series.  If you want a meta-story to tell it’s simply this: Star Trek The Next Generation is such a deep and rich world that you should go get lost.  And while you’re on the path of getting lost do me a favor: retain some leadership tidbits from Picard and sprinkle in some logical takeaways from Data.

 

#IronViz – Let’s Go on a Pokémon Safari!

It’s that time again – Iron Viz!  The second round of Iron Viz entered my world via an email with a very enticing “Iron Viz goes on Safari!” theme.  My mind immediately got stuck on one thing: Pokémon Safari Zone.

Growing up I was a huge gamer and Pokémon was (and still is) one of my favorites.  I even have a cat named after a Pokémon, it’s Starly (find her in the viz!).  So I knew if I was going to participate that the idea for Pokémon Safari was the only way to go.

I spent a lot of time thinking about how I might want to bring this to life.  Did I want to do a virtual safari of all the pocket monsters?  Did I want to focus on the journey of Ash Ketchum through the Safari Zone?  Did I want to focus on the video games?

After all the thoughts swirled through my mind – I settled on the idea of doing a long form re-creation of Ash Ketchum’s adventure through the Safari Zone in the anime.  I sat down and googled to figure out the episode number and go watch.  But to my surprise the episode has been banned.  It hasn’t made it on much TV and the reason it is banned makes it very unattractive and unfriendly for an Iron Viz long form.  I was gutted and had to set off on a different path.

The investment into the Safari Zone episode got me looking through the general details of the Safari Zone in the games.  And that’s what ended up being my hook.  I tend to think in a very structured format and because there were 4 regions that HAD Safari Zones (or what I’d consider to be the general spirit of one) it made it easy for me to compare each of them against each other.

Beyond that I knew I wanted to keep the spirit of the styling similar to the games.  My goal for the viz is to give the end user an understanding of the types of Pokémon in each game.  To show some basic details about each pocket monster, but to have users almost feel like they’re on the Safari.

There’s also this feeling I wanted to capture – for anyone who has played Pokémon you may know it.  It’s the shake of the tall grass.  It is the tug of the Fishing Pole.  It’s the screen transition.  In a nutshell: what Pokémon did I just encounter?  There is a lot of magic in that moment of tall grass shake and transition to ‘battle’ or ‘encounter’ screen.

My hope is that I captured that well with the treemaps.  You are walking through each individual area and encountering Pokémon.  For the seasoned Safari-goer, you’ll be more interested in knowing WHERE you should go and understanding WHAT you can find there.  Hence the corresponding visuals surrounding.

The last component of this visualization was the Hover interactivity.  I hope it translates well because I wanted the interactivity to be very fluid.  It isn’t a click and uncover – that’s too active.  I wanted this to be a very passive and openly interactive visualization where the user would unearth more through exploring and not have to click.

#IronViz Entry – Mobile Design

Part of being involved in the Tableau community means publicly publishing visualizations to learn and grow.  It’s also a great way to find inspiration.

As I’ve pushed myself to be more active within the local Phoenix Tableau community and social (Twitter) community, I knew it was time to “step up” and make an Iron Viz.

My design aesthetic tends to be minimal, slightly formal, and geared toward (in my mind) elegance.  I like to make dashboards and visualizations that highlight the data, but don’t jump to many conclusions.  I’m very conclusion agnostic, so leading people too far down a path doesn’t always seem right.

All that being said – I wanted to make an Iron Viz entry, but it needed to be simple.  The deadline is September 18 (today as I’m writing this).  So I wanted to develop something relatively straightforward that got to the heart of mobile design.

The data inspiration for the viz actually came from an animated bar chart .gif showing the “Top 10 Economies” growth from 1969 to 2030 that I saw on Twitter.  I thought it would make a nice bump chart or slope chart, and the conclusion of the data was already compelling.

First the data gathering process – relatively simple on this one.  The .gif referenced the source, a quick Google search led me to the results.  I’m going to loosely promise to publish the excel file at some point.

Next up was diving right in.  I recently made a “micro viz” in Tableau 10, designing it exclusively for a very tiny space.  I actually didn’t use the device designer for this one, instead opting to develop the whole thing with my intended sizing.  With the sizing set, development was similar to what I’ve done in the past in v9.3 (version of Tableau I use at my job).

Transitioning to device specific design was different than I thought.  Since I knew the final product (in my mind) would need to have more emphasis placed on the mobile view.  It is after all a mobile design challenge!

Like I mentioned above, I had a pretty good idea of what I wanted the final viz to look like.  I knew there needed to be a bump chart and I was going to call attention to China and India.  What I didn’t realize is that the device designer is really geared toward creating a “master view” and then augmenting that master for the device.  This makes sense to me as I rethink the way the feature was presented.

What this meant for the creative process?  I wasn’t able to make visualizations (sheets) and quickly drop them on the mobile layout.  For each new “potential viz” I had to first drop it on the overall dashboard and then bring it on to the mobile specific dash.  It made the whole process kind of clunky.

I also struggled a bit with getting to formatting features quickly.  I can’t double click on titles to adjust font sizes in device preview, gotta go back to the default layout.  I’ll have to adjust my thought process next time and really think about starting from the default view and optimizing a mobile version.

I probably cheated the viz out of more depth that could have been added if I had truly started with the default dashboard and then made a mobile design.  It is fair to say that the default dashboard has real estate for more data insight and data depth.  I am still very pleased with the overall final results.